All posts by Botzen Design

Eric Strebel who runs an Industrial Design studio called Botzen Design in Detroit, MI. He worked to design the Powermat wireless charge pad for Homedics, sunglasses for Bauch & Lomb, vehicles for Ford Motors, monsters for Clive Barker and the Solar Vox Ultra personal charger. Currently he consults for various companies in the Detroit area and around the globe and teaches Industrial Design at Wayne State University. He recently placed third in the Local Motors Shell Game Changer contest with the Willow Run-A-Bout for the city of Amsterdam.

Glow in the Dark Car Vehicle Antenna Modification How to find your Whip ride Video: C-Max

This video is about making your antenna on your car glow in the dark.

 

Video link

Instuctables article here

 

Glow in the dark Antenna

 

You will need the following

-Removable Vehicle antenna

-120 grit sandpaper

Adhesion Promoter Dupli-Color

-White automotive sandable primer Dupli-color

White Plasti Dip

-Clear Plasti Dip

-Ultra Blue Glow in the dark powder

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I was having a tough time finding my white car occasionally. I wanted to remedy that situation by having an antenna that was unique and stood out in a crowd. I settled on a Glow option as it would be a lighter color than other vehicles  and “of course” glows in the dark!

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I started by simply unscrewing and removing the antenna from the vehicle so I could work on it.

First I lightly sanded the antenna so I could prep it for the adhesion promoter. Then washed it with dish soap to remove any loose particles from sanding, and degreased it.

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Since I had no idea what kind of plastic I was coating I did not want to leave this to chance. I applied three coats of Dupli-Color adhesion promoter to the antenna to guarantee that whatever paint I applied on the antenna would stick. The directions recommend to wait ten minutes between coats.

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Next I layed down a light coat of white automotive primer to create a white base coat. (See video) I kept it light since the I did not want there to be any chance of it cracking. The main purpose of the primer was for the white base color and to improve the adhesion of the plastiDip.

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Once the primer had a chance to set but not fully dry (about 30 minutes) I began to lay down the first of the three coats of Plasti Dip. I waited about 20 minutes in between the coats for the material to flash before I applied the next coat. (“Flash” means some of the solvent in the paint has had time to evaporate, you can tell this when the paint changes from glossy to a satin finish)

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After the third and last white Plasti Dip coat I immediately started to sprinkle on the Ultra Blue Glow in the dark powder (see video). I then sprayed a coat of clear Plasti Dip on top of the powder and repeated the process with another coat of glow powder. I did this three times until I felt there was sufficient glow in the dark material on the antenna.

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I then let that dry about an hour and applied two more coats of clear plasti Dip to seal the powder and make the antenna smooth again. I let it dry for 24 hours before I re-attached it back onto my car.

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That’s it. It glows at dusk, maybe last for 2-3 hours, but is easy to recharge with the headlight of your car, or cell phone flash. Pretty sweet driving around with a glow in the dark whip tail on your car. Nobody else has one! At least for now. Good luck to everyone that tries the mod. Have fun.

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Eric Strebel, is an Industrial Designer living in Southfield MI. He has a home-based Industrial design studio “Botzen Design” and has been designing consumer products for 25+ years ranging from sunglasses for Bauch & Lomb, Traps eyewear, entry level luxury vehicles for Ford, wireless charging PowerMat for Homedics, to magnetic toys for Guidecraft. He specializes in tabletop and handheld products, ranging from routers to cosmetic products to Bluetooth devices and everything in between, he also teaches Industrial Design at Wayne State University and CCS (College for Creative Studies)

 

Follow Eric on Twitter @botzendesign and Subscribe to his Youtube channel.

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Other Videos here  How to Build Ultra Quiet Refrigerator Air Compressor DIY: Silent Homemade Shop set up step by step

Article here

 

 

D.I.Y Ultra Quiet Shop compressor from a refrigerator motor (compressor)

How I built a Ultra Quiet Shop compressor from a refrigerator motor (compressor) for my Industrial design studio workshop. In the video I show you step by step how to build the compressor from parts you can buy on Ebay and your local hardware store, Home Depot, Lowes, Menards, or a scrap yard or an old refrigerator (fridge). Add your own optional Motörhead badges too.

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https://youtu.be/F0rkzVbExmI

I needed to build a very quiet, higher capacity compressor for my Design shop, since the one I have is quite loud and does not have the capacity that I was comfortable with for urethane casting work.

I sourced a 6 gallon tank on eBay for $35 including shipping from a fellow in Indiana. I then needed a refrigerator compressor. I got lucky and have a buddy I play hockey with that is in the small appliance repair business. He was able to get me a new replacement unit that was not needed on a recent job. He was also able to get me some of the copper tubing i needed for the project.

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Everything else was pretty straightforward after that.  I have access to a lot of good fabrication equipment. First I built an adapter plate to mate the tank to the compressor motor. I built this from an old “Big Iron” IBM server cover. I made a cardboard template to follow and then transferred it to the sheet metal and folded the edges for extra strength. Then I applied a bit of primer and paint to finish the exposed metal.

I replaced the original oil in the compressor with 10W40  weight motor oil for added protection.

I mounted the motor on the sheet metal bracket I made and connected the compressor side to the tank with some 1/4-20 socket cap bolts. ”

Next I connected the compressor side to the tank with some 1/4″ copper tubing and a one way check valve to keep the air from flowing out of the tank back through the compressor inlet.

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On the business side of the compressor I used some parts I had laying around including a pressure shut off valve that I had from when I attended college at Pratt in the late 80’s from my dorm airbrush set up! It still all works great and is able to turn the motor on an off with no issues. I also used a main pressure gauge and added a pressure regulator so I could adjust how much air comes out of the tank. Additionally I added a quick disconnect to I an easily connect an air hose to the tank.

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I added a computer electric socket connector to the set up so I can remove the power cord if I need to as well.

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The key to making the whole thing ultra quiet is building a intake manifold that absorbs the sound of the compressor. For this I used a spent metal aerosol travel shaving cream can. It already had openings at both ends and was perfect for my needs. I packed it with some brass wool to help absorb the sound and added some pink packing foam for a filter. The combination of the metal can and the brass wool significantly mutes the sound and makes the whole set up extremely quite.

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Last but not least I added some Motörhead badges to give it some character. Lemmy R.I.P

A fun build and an essential piece of shop equipment to have when making Industrial Design models and prototypes.

Eric Strebel, is an Industrial Designer living in Southfield MI. He has a home-based Industrial design studio “Botzen Design” and has been designing consumer products for 25+ years ranging from sunglasses for Bauch & Lomb, Traps eyewear, entry level luxury vehicles for Ford, wireless charging PowerMat for Homedics, to magnetic toys for Guidecraft. He specializes in tabletop and handheld products, ranging from routers to cosmetic products to Bluetooth devices and everything in between, he also teaches Industrial Design at Wayne State University and CCS (College for Creative Studies)

 

Follow Eric on Twitter @botzendesign and Subscribe to his Youtube channel.

 

 

A design journey from concept to functioning prototype: Industrial Design how to videos

A series of 8 Instructional maker videos that take the user on a journey from design concept to working prototype. The video series is intended for designers that need to learn more about the design process and the making of functional mockups. The series shows how to sketch concepts and turn them in to actual physical functional prototypes.
Each how to design video is filled with helpful tips and detailed information about the design and build process, with step by step information and detailed instruction about the building of the “Solar Vox” a solar charger.

Eric Strebel is an Industrial designer with 25+ years of experience. He graduated from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn NY in 1990 and has been designing products for clients all around the globe, ranging from sunglasses for Bauch & Lomb, entry level luxury vehicles for Ford, wireless charging PowerMat for Homedics, to toys for Guidecraft. He specializes in tabletop and hand held products.

SolarVoxUltra

You can follow Botzen Design on Twitter and Google+ and Facebook, or sign up here for the occasional newsletter from Botzen Design. Subscribe to the YouTube and watch all the industrial design videos as well.

2015 Upcycled Lobster TRAPS Eyewear collection designed by Eric Strebel of Botzen Design

Sunglasses made from wood, that’s fairly common these days. Designing with locally sourced East Coast material from the state of Maine, now that’s uncommon!  Meet the Up cycled eye-wear from Traps that are made of decommissioned Lobster traps.

Industrial designer Eric Strebel of Botzen Design in Detroit began design work on the first pair of glasses for Traps Eyewear in February of 2014. The first pair, The “Ulysses” is a classic interpretation of a unisex oversize pair of sunglasses. Traps wanted to create a product that was effortlessly stylish, using re-purposed Atlantic ocean aged oak lobster traps and sustainable materials. Using recycled materials was the obvious choice to attract the “Y” generation to a new pair of sunglasses. You can watch the video here of Eric designing and prototyping the glasses.

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The second pair is inspired by John F. Kennedy. These are called the “Jack”. Both pairs use acetate for the frames. It is a non-petroleum based plastic that is made from natural cotton and wood fibers. Cellulose acetate is made from renewable materials, and that is great for everyone on the planet.

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The design process followed a proven path of getting a solid design brief from the customer and sketching on the clients direction. Initial concepts were refined and sifted down to produce stylish eco-friendly glasses that are simple yet recognizable.

The front frames are hand crafted in hypoallergenic Italian Acetate, lightweight and quite strong. The frames are made from cutting, heat forming and polishing flat sheets of the material into the desired form. Cellulose acetate is considered the gold standard in eye wear and were an obvious choice for these sunglasses. The Bio Lenses are made from a castor oil as well. The product is quite environmentally conscious.

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The glasses are available directly from the Traps web site.  There is a special edition available from Friedrich’s in their Manhattan location as well are their Palm Beach locations, using horn frames and a multi grain temple combing birds eye maple and walnut.

Eric Strebel is an Industrial designer with 25+ years of experience. He graduated from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn NY in 1990 and has been designing products for clients all around the globe, ranging from sunglasses for Bauch & Lomb, entry level luxury vehicles for Ford, wireless charging PowerMat for Homedics, to toys for Guidecraft. He specializes in tabletop and hand held products.

You can follow Botzen Design on Twitter and Google+ and Facebook, or sign up here for the occasional newsletter from Botzen Design. Subscribe to the YouTube and watch all the industrial design videos as well.

2014 Another year of design success at the Botzen Studio!

WOW! What another unbelievable year of product design it has been this year at Botzen Design! I worked on design projects ranging from sunglasses to industrial equipment, phone cases, drones and credit card readers.

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The Ulysses

In January I began a journey with a client to develop a pair of classic sunglasses “Ulysses” that used aged Maine oak lobster traps. The project sprouted into a second pair of sunglasses “The Jack” that are based on the 35th president JFK and his classic look. Traps Eyewear will soon be shipping both pairs of “eco” glasses, look for more information about the glasses very soon!

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Currently I am working on some great new products for the Danish industrial group BM-Teknik. I am designing two new products for them as they expand out of the Scandinavian market in to the global market including the United States. These products will be sold under the Cougartron name. More about those products will be revealed in the upcoming year.

PowerClix magnetic adventure toy

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The three magnetic robot toys I designed for Guidecraft PolyMech, ReptileMech, and TeraMech are available for purchase through Target online, and Amazon, and even Brookstone.

Recently I launched my Industrial Design Video On Demand channel on Vimeo, A design journey from concept to functioning prototype The 8 part series take you on a step by step voyage of how to build a functioning solar charger prototype. The latest series focuses on the ideation sketching process of the Red Jack adventure vehicle pictured above. You can see the trailers on Youtube as well.

Are you are looking to have a consumer product designed, visualized and prototyped? Feel free to reply to this email and lets set up a time to chat. Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter and Google+, click any of the links below to follow me on your favorite social media site, or sign up here if you were forwarded this bulletin. Look for more updates soon!

I want to wish each of you a Happy New Year to you and your families!

Best wishes

Eric Strebel

Search Botzen and check out my other blogs!

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Botzen Design announces 3D printing and rapid prototyping services

Gear test Botzen Design

Rapid prototype gear printed at 75 (.075mm) micron layers thickness

Botzen Design a Metro Detroit based Industrial Design firm run by Eric Strebel now has 3D printing capabilities. Additive manufacturing is making products more exciting and come alive faster than ever. The expanded capabilities will allow Botzen to design better quality products in less time than ever. It will also allow Botzen to act as a service bureau to create rapid objects for other companies and individuals with prepared CAD files to get 3D printed objects quickly at an affordable price.  The resin based prototypes are very durable and excellent for everything from small engineering parts, toys, action figures, small hand held products and small injection molded parts, as well as investment casting for jewelry! With layer thicknesses as thin as 50 microns per layer models are detailed and accurate and more affordable that you think.

Painted Head

So…what is 3D printing?

3D printing is a printer that creates a three dimensional object.  This is done by creating layer by successive layer, until the entire object is complete. Every 3D-printed object begins with a digital Computer Aided Design (CAD) file, created with a 3D modeling program, or which was scanned into a 3D modeling program with a 3D scanner. To get from this digital file into instructions that the 3D printer understands, software then slices the design into hundred or thousands of horizontal layers.  The 3D printer reads this file, and proceeds to create each layer exactly to specification. As the layers are created, they blend together with no hint of the layering visible, resulting in one three dimensional object.

Eric Strebel who runs an Industrial Design studio called Botzen Design in Detroit, MI.  He worked to design the Powermat wireless charge pad for Homedics, sunglasses for Bauch & Lomb, vehicles for Ford Motors, monsters for Clive Barker and the Solar Vox Ultra personal charger. Currently he consults for various companies in the Detroit area and around the globe and teaches Industrial Design at Wayne State University. He recently placed third in the Local Motors Shell Game Changer contest with the Willow Run-A-Bout for the city of Amsterdam.

Botzen Design, Inc., Detroit Michigan

www.botzen.com

email: info@botzen.com

Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/lunakov

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/botzendesign

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/botzendesign

You can watch the assembly of the unit here on Youtube.

WOW! What a year of design success it has been this year at the Botzen Studio!

This year has absolutely flown by with so many successful design projects and new clients I don’t even know where to start…..Youtube anyone? My design videos have gotten a bit of exposure this past year, over 85,000 views and I suddenly have over 600 subscribers to my channel! Recently, I was featured on the Prismacolor facebook page for the black and white Prismacolor pencil sketch that I did. Next year, I hope to publish a few more design videos, so look for those throughout the year.

A few of the products that I had the pleasure of designing last year made their way into production in 2013 including; The EL shutter shades that I designed for Lift Audio as well as the Saferide vehicle adapter from Saferide.

Final glam shots B copy

This past year also saw the addition of a 3D printer into my arsenal of design tools in the workshop at my studio. This tool has changed the landscape for product design in so many ways. Testing forms, ideas and concepts has never been easier than now with in-house 3D printing capabilities.

I was also lucky enough to do some design work for a few new clients that were looking for some fresh ideas, including concepts for an Aluminum Multifunctional Carabiner, a kids GPS bracelet for Precise Innovation, LLC, some drinking fountain concepts for Haws Corporation out of Nevada and some really fun design research projects for Zingermans right here in Ann Arbor Michigan.

I have also been working on some dramatic Sci-Fi play toys for a client for most of the year. I can not reveal anymore than that. The toys should be available for retail purchase in Spring 2014. If you are at the Spielwarenmesse in Nürnberg Germany in January you will get to see them debut OR if you are in New York City at the Toy Fair in February you will get to see me and I can show them to you personally! I am so excited for these toys that I have laboured over since June when the project began. To see them go from concept to prototype then to production in the time span of the last 6 months has been truly amazing! I am bursting with excitement and can’t wait to go to the Toy Fair and see them with all the other amazing toys at the show!

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Also, I will also be teaching again very soon in January 2014 at Wayne State University starting in a few weeks after a hiatus of a few years. I will be teaching the Design Studio class to the Juniors and graduating Seniors. It is one of my favorite things to do in life. I truly enjoy teaching and giving back to the world about what I am most passionate about, Design!

I already have a few new projects underway for the beginning of the year and am sure many more exciting ones will present themselves over the next 12 months. I am looking forward to another great year.

I want to wish each of you a Happy New Year to you and your families!

Best wishes

Eric Strebel

Search Botzen and check out my other blogs!

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